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Coronavirus: What financial support is available for your business?

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Editor’s note: This article was first published on 24 March 2020 and is being updated regularly.

With businesses around the country facing increasing levels of uncertainty due to coronavirus, the UK government has announced a series of financial support measures to help them.

But what does this mean for your business?

In this article, we provide details on the financial support that is available for your business and how you can access it. We cover the following:

VAT rate cut for hospitality and tourism businesses [new]

Bounce Back Loan Scheme

Self-Employment Income Support Scheme

Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme​

Job Retention Bonus​ [new]

Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme​

Coronavirus Large Business Interruption Loan Scheme​

Future Fund

Grants and loans for SMEs focused on research and development

Reimbursement of Statutory Sick Pay

VAT deferral​

Income Tax deferral for self-employed individuals

HMRC Time to Pay

£10,000 Small Business Grant Scheme

£25,000 Retail and Hospitality Grant Scheme

Business rates holiday

Ban on evictions for commercial tenants who miss rent payments

Charity sector funding support

We’ve also spoken to decision makers at small and medium-sized businesses to get their views on coronavirus, how it’s impacted their companies, and the support provided by the government.

You’ll find the survey results in our report, 3 months on: Learning from lockdown, and a summarised version in our infographic:

Coronavirus: The view from businesses

What is it?

A cut in VAT that will be in place for six months, starting from 15 July 2020 and ending on 12 January 2021.

Who is eligible?

Businesses within the hospitality and tourism sector (including pubs, bars, restaurants, hotels, B&Bs, and entertainment attractions) are eligible for the VAT rate cut.

What it covers

VAT is being cut from 20% to 5% on most goods and services supplied by the tourism and hospitality sectors.

The cut is applicable for accommodation, admission to entertainment attractions, non-alcoholic drinks, and food.

How your business can access it

There’s no need to apply. We’ve created an article on the Summer Statement from the chancellor and it features more details on the changes to VAT.

What is it?

A loan scheme offering support to eligible businesses that have been negatively affected by coronavirus. The scheme is being delivered by a number of accredited lenders.

Who is eligible?

Small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) based in the UK are eligible for the Bounce Back Loan Scheme. Another eligibility clause is that your business was not an ‘undertaking in difficulty’ on 31 December 2019.

Notably, if your business is already claiming funds via the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme, you won’t be eligible for this loan scheme.

However, if you’ve received a loan up to £50,000 via that scheme and want to transfer it to the Bounce Back Loan Scheme, you have until 4 November 2020 to arrange this.

In addition, the following businesses aren’t eligible for this scheme:

  • State-funded primary and secondary schools
  • Grant-funded further education institutions
  • Public sector bodies
  • Banks, insurers and reinsurers (not including insurance brokers)

What it covers

SMEs can borrow between £2,000 and £50,000 as part of the Bounce Back Loan Scheme. Businesses can apply for a loan for 25% of their turnover up to the maximum of £50,000.

The loans have a 100% guarantee from the government and there’s no interest or fees to pay for the first 12 months.

The term of the loans are six years and businesses don’t need to make repayments for the first 12 months. The interest rate for the loan is set at 2.5%.

How your business can access it

The Bounce Back Loan Scheme launched on 4 May 2020. To apply for it, choose one of the accredited lenders, which includes high-street banks, and check their lending requirements.

Ideally, choose your own lender for this process. If you find you can’t get the finance you need, approach one of the other lenders.

You may also need access to the following information about your business:

  • Company registration number
  • Business account number and sort code
  • Estimated annual turnover

You need to fill in a short loan application form online (including the details above if required).

If your application is approved, you should receive the funds in your account within a matter of days (it could be within 48 hours).

What is it?

A grant scheme aimed at self-employed people or members of a partnership in the UK whose businesses have been affected by the coronavirus outbreak. It is similar, but not identical, to the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme.

The scheme offer two grants. If you’re eligible for the scheme, you can claim one grant or you can go for both.

Who is eligible?

Self-employed people or members of a partnership in the UK are eligible for the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme. However, there are further criteria to be aware of.

More than half your taxable income must come from self-employment (including partnership income), you need to have traded (through your own business or as part of a partnership) in the 2019/20 tax year, and you must intend to continue to trade in the 2020/21 tax year.

You also need to either still be trading or had intended to be trading but changed your plans due to coronavirus.

Your trading profit (either in 2018/19 or the average of the tax years you worked during tax years 2016/17, 2017/18 and 2018/19) must be £50,000 or less.

You need to have submitted your 2018/19 Self Assessment tax return on or before 23 April 2020.

HMRC has an online tool that you can use to check whether you’re eligible for the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme.

What it covers

Two grants are available and each one covers the equivalent of three months of trading.

For the first grant, you’re able to claim 80% of your average earnings for three months. This is capped at £2,500 per month, so could be worth a total of £7,500, but is calculated by taking a basic average of your taxable profits. You can claim this grant up to 13 July 2020.

For the second grant, you can claim 70% of your average earnings for three months. This is capped at £2,190 per month, meaning it could be worth a total of £6,570. Like the first grant, it’s also calculated by taking a basic average of your taxable profits. You can claim the second grant in August 2020.

Once HMRC has calculated what your grant total is, the funds will be transferred into your account as a lump sum.

How your business can access it

Note that, unlike some of the other grants mentioned in this article, these grants are not automatically provided to you. Application is necessary via HMRC’s online portal.

Applications for the first grant began on 13 May 2020 and close on 13 July 2020. For the second grant, applications begin in August 2020 – there are no details yet on when it will close.

In addition to your National Insurance number, Unique Taxpayer Reference and Government Gateway details, you’ll need your bank sort code and account number when making a claim, so HMRC can transfer the funds to your bank account if your claim is successful – and you’ll learn the result immediately.

The funds will be paid into your account within six working days of making a successful claim.

Make sure you keep a record of the grants (no matter whether you claim one or both), in line with your self-employment record keeping, as you’ll need to report on them in your Self Assessment tax return.

You also should only claim if you’ve genuinely lost out due to coronavirus disruption.

What is it?

This scheme has been set up to support employers whose businesses have been affected by coronavirus and help them continue to pay the wages of staff who would otherwise have been let go.

Who is eligible?

All UK businesses, including charities, are eligible for the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme. There isn’t a cap on the number of workers who can be selected for the scheme.

What it covers

There are now two phases to the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme.

In the first phase, which is active now, the government is reimbursing 80% of furloughed workers’ wages, up to £2,500 per employee per month. Your business can top up these salaries if you wish.

Your workers need to be currently working in your business – and not have been laid off or made redundant – in order for you to access the scheme.

If required, they can take on other jobs with other businesses; doing so won’t impact on this cover – but they can’t do any work for the employer who claims under the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme.

At the end of May 2020, the chancellor announced details of the second phase of the scheme.

From 1 July 2020, businesses will be able to bring furloughed employees back to work under the ‘flexible furlough’ part of the scheme.

Individual businesses can decide on the hours and shift patterns that returning employees do on their return (on a flexible part-time basis). Businesses will be responsible for paying the wages of these employees while they are in work.

However, they can claim the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme grant for normal hours that aren’t worked.

Between 1 August 2020 until the end of October 2020, businesses will increasingly be required to contribute to the scheme alongside the government.

Crucially, furloughed staff will still receive 80% of their salaries covering the period when they’re unable to work.

Here’s what this will look like for your business:

June: The government pays 80% of wages, capped at £2,500. It also pays employer National Insurance and pension contributions. Employers don’t have to pay anything.

July: The government pays 80% of wages, capped at £2,500. It also pays employer National Insurance and pension contributions. Employers don’t have to pay anything.

August: The government pays 80% of wages, capped at £2,500. Employers have to pay for employer National Insurance and pension contributions.

September: The government pays 70% of wages, capped at £2,187.50. Employers have to pay for employer National Insurance and pension contributions, and 10% of wages – with the 70% from the government, this makes up the 80% total, capped at £2,500.

October: The government pays 60% of wages, capped at £1,875. Employers have to pay for employer National Insurance and pension contributions, and 20% of wages – with the 60% from the government, this makes up the 80% total, capped at £2,500.

The first phase of the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme will close to new entrants on 30 June 2020.

However, to complete the minimum furlough period before this date, if your business wanted to add new employees to the scheme, you needed to do so by 10 June.

The Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme will close at the end of October 2020.

How your business can access it

You can use HMRC’s online portal and reimbursement system to make a claim.

To access the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, you need to designate affected employees as ‘furloughed workers’ and notify your employees of this change. These changes remain subject to existing employment law.​

Next, submit information about the employees that have been furloughed to HMRC, including salary details.

As part of the first phase of the scheme, HMRC will reimburse 80% of furloughed workers’ wages, as highlighted above, within six working days after you’ve made a claim.

Further details on the next phase of the scheme can be found in this article: Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme FAQ: What it means for employers.

Job Retention Scheme webinar

Find out about the Job Retention Scheme, what information you need to collect, how to reclaim, and how to process furloughed pay.

Find out more

What is it?

A bonus payment to incentivise employers to keep on furloughed employees after bringing them back to work.

Who is eligible?

All businesses that have furloughed staff as part of the Job Retention Scheme, which concludes at the end of October 2020.

What it covers

If your business brings furloughed employees back and they are working continuously for you between November 2020 and January 2021 (employees need to be earning an average of at least £520 in each month), your company will receive a one-off bonus of £1,000 for each employee in February 2021.

According to the chancellor, nine million people have been furloughed, meaning the Job Retention Bonus could cost the government up to £9bn.

How your business can access it

The government will share more details in due course, most likely during the Autumn Budget.

What is it?

A loan scheme that has been set up to help small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) that are struggling with cash flow because of revenues that have been deferred or lost due to the coronavirus outbreak. The loans are being offered on generous terms to support SMEs.

Who is eligible?

Any UK-based business that has a turnover less than £45m is eligible for the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme. Businesses are eligible if they have been disrupted by coronavirus and need to self-certify that this is the case.

What it covers

The Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme allows SMEs to access a loan between £1,000 and £5m.

The loan scheme covers several business financing services, including term loans, overdrafts, asset finance and invoice finance.​

Finance terms are up to six years for loans and asset finance facilities. For overdrafts and invoice finance facilities, terms are up to three years.

The loans are offered through a number of finance providers and are backed by a government guarantee that covers up to 80% of the balance. This will enable lenders to turn ‘no’ financing decisions into more ‘yes’ decisions​.

Interest and fees for the loans will be paid by the government for the first 12 months.

How your business can access it

The Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme is available now and is operated by more than 40 accredited lenders, including high street banks that offer services to SMEs. Your first step should be to speak to your current banking provider.

To access the funding, you need to confirm that your turnover is less than £45m. You also have to provide a borrowing proposal that would be considered viable by the lender if the coronavirus disruption was taken out of the equation.

In addition, you need to demonstrate that the provision of finance will allow your business to trade out of any short to medium term difficulty.

Lenders won’t ask you for personal guarantees on savings or property for loans that are less than £250,000. For loans that are more than this amount, banks might ask for personal guarantees.

It’s worth remembering that the borrower always remains 100% liable for the debt.

What is it?

A loan scheme that has been set up to help large businesses that are struggling with cash flow due to revenues being deferred or lost due to coronavirus.

Who is eligible?

To be eligible, businesses need to have an annual turnover that’s more than £45m and business activity has to be based in the UK.

The scheme is open to businesses that have been affected by coronavirus and can’t secure regular commercial funding.

Companies from all sectors can apply for the Coronavirus Large Business Interruption Loan Scheme, however the following are not eligible:

  • Banks and building societies
  • Insurers and reinsurers (but not insurance brokers)
  • Public sector organisations (this includes primary and secondary schools)
  • Employer, professional, religious and political membership organisations
  • Trade unions

What it covers

Following amends to the scheme from the government, from 26 May 2020, eligible businesses can borrow up to 20% of their turnover, with a cap of £200m.

(Under the current setup, for large businesses with an annual turnover that is between £45m and £250m, banks can offer loans of up to £25m, which are backed by an 80% guarantee from the government. And for those companies with an annual turnover that exceeds £250m, loans of up to £50m will be available to them.)

If businesses want to borrow more than £50m, they will be subject to restrictions on dividend payments, senior pay and share buy-backs during the period of the loan, including a ban on dividend payments and cash bonuses, except where they were previously agreed.

Any lenders who wish to offer larger loans will be required to undergo further accreditation checks.

Lenders will carry out the usual credit risk checks. However, the aim of the government guarantee is to enable more ‘no’ decisions to become ‘yes’ outcomes.

Short-term loans, overdrafts, invoice finance and asset finance are the products included in the scheme, and will be offered at commercial rates of interest.

How your business can access it

If your business is eligible, you can access the Coronavirus Large Business Interruption Loan Scheme now (and as mentioned above, the extended version of the scheme comes into play on 26 May 2020). A list of approved lenders has been provided by the British Business Bank.

To access the funding, you need to confirm your annual business turnover exceeds £45m. You must provide a borrowing proposal that would be considered viable by the lender if the coronavirus disruption was taken out of the equation.

Coronavirus: Government funding support tool

Use this simple tool to help you understand which government schemes your business is likely to be eligible for and guidance on accessing them.

Find out more

What is it?

A £500m loan scheme aimed at high-growth businesses, which was launched by the government in April 2020. The Future Fund has been created to ensure eligible businesses can access the investment they require to keep functioning.

Who is eligible?

High-growth businesses that are unlisted UK registered companies. In the past five years, they must have previously raised a minimum of £250,000 in equity investment from third-party investors.

What it covers

The Future Fund is being delivered in partnership with the British Business Bank and the funding can only be used for working capital purposes. The government is committing £250m to the fund and may increase this figure if required.

The government is making unsecured bridge funding available for the scheme, which has to at least be matched by private investors.

Loans to eligible companies can only make up a maximum of 50% of the bridge funding that is offered – investors have to provide the remaining amount (and can exceed this if they wish).

On the company’s next qualifying funding round, the bridge funding will convert into equity.

How your business can access it

The Future Fund scheme opened for applications on 20 May 2020. It will run until the end of September 2020, although this end date could be extended in the future.

The application process is investor led, rather than your company leading on it. This means the investor, or the lead investor of a group of investors, needs to apply for the Future Fund in connection with your business (as long as you’re eligible for the scheme). Applications can be made online.

Once an application has been initiated, your business needs to confirm the accuracy of the investment application details provided, before submitting the full application.

If an application is approved, all parties will execute an agreement and satisfy certain conditions set out in the agreement before the funds are released. Investors and the Future Fund will both invest using a convertible loan agreement, which is predefined and can’t be negotiated.

What is it?

A £750m funding pot for small and medium-sized business that are driving research and development (R&D), which was announced by the government and Innovate UK in April 2020.

Who is eligible?

The targeted support is for the most R&D-intensive small and medium-sized businesses.

What it covers

The funding will be available via Innovate UK’s grant and loan scheme.

Of the financial support, grants and loans will be made available for Innovate UK’s existing customers. Meanwhile, £175,000 of support will be offered to approximately 1,200 businesses that aren’t currently in receipt of funding from Innovate UK.

How your business can access it

The first payments will be made by the middle of May 2020. Payments will be made to Innovate UK customers that have opted in for the funding. Details for businesses that aren’t customers of Innovate UK will be revealed in due course.

What is it?

Statutory Sick Pay (SSP) is paid by employers to employees who are off work because of sickness. The government has said it will reimburse employees who have to make payments in light of coronavirus.

Who is eligible?

Businesses based in the UK that employ fewer than 250 UK employees as of 28 February 2020 are eligible to have Statutory Sick Pay reimbursed.

What does it cover?

You will be able to reclaim Statutory Sick Pay for those employees who have been unable to work because of coronavirus. It’s up to two weeks of sickness absence per employee​.

Any employees who are unable to work due to coronavirus are able to claim Statutory Sick Pay from day one rather than the usual day four of sickness, following a temporary change by the government.

How your business can access it

Your business will be able to make claims via a new HMRC online service from 26 May 2020.

You’ll receive repayments at the relevant rate of Statutory Sick Pay that you’ve paid to current or former employees for eligible periods of sickness starting on or after 13 March 2020.

Tax agents will also be able to make claims on behalf of employers.

Make sure you keep records of absences and payments of Statutory Sick Pay to employees claiming due to coronavirus in case you need to present them in order to get your payments reimbursed.

What is it?

The chancellor has announced that businesses are able to defer VAT payments for a three month period in 2020.

Who is eligible?

All UK businesses are eligible for the deferred VAT payments.​

What does it cover?

Your business can defer VAT payments for the period from 20 March 2020 to 30 June 2020. You’re not required to make a VAT payment during this time period and have until the end of the 2020/21 tax year to pay any liabilities that are accumulated.

How your business can access it

There’s no need to apply for the deferred VAT payments as it’s an automatic offer. You don’t need to make a VAT payment by 30 June 2020 if you don’t wish to – you now have an extended deadline of the end of the 2020/21 tax year. VAT refunds and reclaims will be paid by the government as usual.​

What is it?

The chancellor has announced that all individuals who pay Income Tax on the profits from their self-employment are able to defer any payments due by 31 July 2020 until the end of January 2021.

What does it cover?

It covers Self Assessment Income Tax payments. They are usually due on 31 July. However, in this case, those payments are now deferred until 31 January 2021.

How your business can access it

There’s no need to apply for the Income Tax deferral as it’s an automatic offer. You don’t need to make an Income Tax payment by 31 July 2020 if you don’t wish to – you now have an extended deadline of 31 January 2021. Income Tax refunds will be paid by the government as usual.

What is it?

Time to Pay is an existing HMRC scheme that allows businesses in financial distress to receive more time to settle financial obligations to HMRC. However, they must show that they have a reasonable ability to make their payments in the future​.

Who is eligible?

All UK businesses are eligible for HMRC’s Time to Pay scheme.

What does it cover?

If your business (or you are self-employed) is struggling to meet outstanding tax obligations due to financial difficulties, you can contact HMRC to see if you are eligible for support via its Time to Pay scheme.

This service has been scaled up to support more businesses and self-employed individuals due to coronavirus.

How your business can access it

If your business (or as a self-employed individual) has missed a tax payment or you’re concerned about making your next tax payment due to the impact of coronavirus, you can contact HMRC.

Call the helpline number, on 0800 0159 559, to see if you are eligible for Time to Pay support. Help from HMRC is assessed on a case-by-case basis.

What is it?

A scheme offering a one-off £10,000 grant to eligible small businesses. Note that the requirements to receive the grant will depend on where your business is located in the UK.

Who is eligible?

The Small Business Grant Scheme covers 700,000 of the UK’s smallest businesses. Your business must occupy a property in order to receive the grant. There are regional requirements to be aware of:

England: Your business is eligible if you already receive small business rate relief and/or rural rate relief.

Scotland: Your business is eligible if you’re in receipt of the small business bonus scheme or rural relief.

Wales: If your business has a rateable value that’s less than £12,000, you are eligible.

Northern Ireland: If your business have a net annual value that’s up to £15,000, you’re eligible for the scheme.

What does it cover?

The grant can be used to cover ongoing business costs in light of the coronavirus and its impact on your company.

How your business can access it

Local authorities in England have been instructed to write to businesses who are eligible to receive this grant.​ It’s worth checking your local authority website for more information and guidance on when your business can expect to receive the grant.

It’s expected that local authorities will automatically pay the grant to eligible businesses.

If your company is eligible but you’re concerned your local authority doesn’t have your business bank details so it can make a grant payment, contact them for guidance.

What is it?

A scheme offering a one-off £25,000 grant to eligible retail, hospitality and leisure businesses. Note that the requirements to receive the grant will depend on where your business is located in the UK.

Who is eligible?

The Retail and Hospitality Grant Scheme covers businesses in the retail, hospitality and leisure sector. There are regional requirements to be aware of:

England: Your business needs to have a rateable value between £15,001 and £51,000​ to be eligible.

Scotland: To be eligible, your business needs to have a rateable value between £18,000 and £51,000.

Wales: Your business needs to have a rateable value between £12,001 and £51,000 to be eligible.

Northern Ireland: To be eligible, your business needs to have a rateable value up to £51,000.

What does it cover?

The grant covers businesses and properties that are wholly or mainly being used:

  • As shops, restaurants, cafes, drinking establishments, cinemas and live music venues​
  • For assembly and leisure​
  • As hotels, guest and boarding premises, and self-catering accommodation​.

If the rateable value of your business is below the figures highlighted above for your region, you won’t receive the one-off grant of £25,000. However, if eligible, you will receive the £10,000 grant from the Small Business Grant Scheme.

How your business can access it

Local authorities in England have been instructed to write to businesses who are eligible to receive this grant.​ It’s worth checking your local authority website for more information and guidance on when your business can expect to receive the grant.

It’s expected that local authorities will automatically pay the grant to eligible businesses.

If your company is eligible but you’re concerned your local authority doesn’t have your business bank details so it can make a grant payment, contact them for guidance.

What is it?

Businesses in a number of eligible sectors (highlighted below) don’t have to pay business rates for 12 months, covering the 2020/21 tax period. This will support them as they work to maintain property payments and cover ongoing costs.

Who is eligible?

The business rates holiday is applicable to companies in the retail, hospitality, leisure or early years sectors. It has been extended to estate agents, letting agencies and bingo halls that have also been impacted by coronavirus and required to close.

The requirements may differ depending on your location (such as for Northern Ireland where the business rates holiday is for three months – April, May and June 2020). Here is more information for Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

What does it cover?

The grant covers businesses and properties that are wholly or mainly being used:

  • As shops, restaurants, cafes, drinking establishments, cinemas and live music venues​
  • Estate agents, letting agencies and bingo halls
  • For assembly and leisure​
  • As hotels, guest and boarding premises and self-catering accommodation​
  • Occupied by providers on Ofsted’s Early Years Register​
  • For the provision of the Early Years Foundation Stage.​

The government has confirmed that businesses who received the retail discount in the 2019/20 tax year will be rebilled by their local authority as soon as possible.

How your business can access it

No action should be required as these changes should be made automatically for your next council tax bill for April 2020.​ However, in some cases local authorities may have to reissue your bill automatically to exclude the business rate charge​.

Local authorities will be providing updated guidance for businesses​. It’s worth checking the website of your local authority for more details.

You can estimate what your business will save from this relief by using the government’s business rates calculator.

What is it?

A legal ban on landlords evicting commercial tenants solely due to missing a rent payment due to coronavirus.

Who is eligible?

All businesses renting property who are unable to pay their rent due to coronavirus.

What does it cover?

Rent will be due as normal, however this moratorium on evictions prevents landlords from enforcing the eviction of a commercial tenant for the next three months.

How your business can access it

No action should be required as the courts will not process any claims for commercial evictions during this time​.

What is it?

Funding support for charities that are supporting vulnerable people, providing key services or working in the heart of local communities.

Who is eligible?

Frontline charities that need support during the coronavirus outbreak are eligible for charity financial support.

What it covers

A £750m package of financial support has been made available by the Treasury for frontline charities across the UK.

Government departments will be offering £360m of the funding, which will be directly allocated to charities that are providing key services and support vulnerable people.

This includes hospices, charities that support domestic abuse victims, St John’s Ambulance, Citizens Advice, and charities supporting vulnerable children.

Meanwhile, £370m will be available for smaller charities, including through a grant that will go to the National Lottery Community Fund.

This support will be aimed at smaller organisations at the heart of local communities that are offering vital services to people during the coronavirus outbreak by providing financial advice, and delivering food and medicine.

And the government pledged to match funds raised for the BBC’s Big Night In charity appeal, with a contribution of at least £20m that will go to the National Emergencies Trust.

How your business can access it

The government will pay grants directly to any large charities that are delivering essential services.

Small charities that are working in local communities can apply for funding through the National Lottery Community Fund once the coronavirus grant pot is up and running in the coming weeks.

As coronavirus continues to impact upon businesses, we reached out to decision makers at companies around the UK to find out how they’ve been managing their processes and what their views are around government support.

We’ve compiled their responses in a report, 3 months on: Learning from lockdown. You can see a summarised version in the infographic (which you can click on to download the report) below.

How the coronavirus pandemic has impacted SMEs infographic

Conclusion on financial support

With a series of financial support measures on the table, it’s worth exploring which ones your business is eligible for and taking steps (where required) to get the help you need so you can stay on top of cash flow and revenues, while also continuing to support your staff.

Coronavirus and your business

We’ve gathered information and resources to help navigate this situation, including tools and webinars, to help you understand what financial support is available.

Find out more