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How to be emotionally intelligent

Season 1: Finding and keeping great people

Charlie Gladstone Author and Creative Entrepreneur

How to be emotionally intelligent

I’ve built happy teams and successful businesses for more than three decades now. There have been incredible times, full of highs and lows, and some truly outstanding people who’ve worked with me for many years.

During this time, I’ve learnt that a positive and supportive environment for staff is crucial. One rooted in kindness, respect and the principle of equality, with a strong company culture and shared values. Once that’s in place, the best people will want to join you. They’ll want to stay. And a team that stays together and grows together is a winning team. Just like your business.

Through clarity comes harmony

It should come as no surprise that the way you interact with staff is the single most important thing you do. Many underestimate the influence of their own behaviour in the workplace and how that can affect others. It can lead to a lack of harmony, causing issues and tensions to fester.

Unchecked emotions can cause volatility and instability in a team. They can be disruptive and consume time and energy. You can’t expect an emotion-free work environment. What you can do is develop the power of emotional intelligence in yourself, to keep those energies in check and, crucially, to foster deeper respect and positive relationships among team members.

Tools to bring your team together 

The ability to observe your own emotions and empathise with the emotions of others is something all leaders need to learn. By understanding your emotions and your triggers, you can begin to regulate them. From this place of mindful presence and self-control, you’ll be far better able to deal with disruptive situations that may arise within your team. By managing these situations with diplomacy, calmness and patience, you’ll diffuse situations before they spark. To give you an example, if someone disagrees with something in a meeting and things start to escalate, rather than weigh in with your opinion, visibly ‘lean in’ towards them to demonstrate that you are actively listening. It’s surprising how quickly this can diffuse a situation.

A new model for success

  The insights and techniques I want to share with you will help you develop the single greatest quality you can bring to work each day. That’s a big statement, I know. But emotional intelligence has the potential to change you, how you engage with your team, and the dynamic of your business.

And best of all, anyone can learn it.

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